Lisinopril Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, and More

Lisinopril: Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, and More

Table of Contents

Lisinopril: Side Effects, Dosage, Uses, and More

What are the most common side effects of lisinopril?Is lisinopril a high blood pressure medicine?Why you should not take lisinopril?What does the body do to lisinopril? lisinopril brand name,lisinopril mechanism of action,lisinopril side effects,lisinopril dose,lisinopril 10 mg,long term side effects of lisinopril,how much will 10 mg lisinopril lower blood pressure, lisinopril 20 mg,lisinopril side effects,lisinopril brand name,lisinopril dose,lisinopril 10 mg,lisinopril class,lisinopril 5 mg

Highlights for lisinopril

Oral tablets of lisinopril are offered as both a generic and a brand-name version of the medication. Both Prinivil and Zestril are popular brand names.

Tablets and oral solutions of lisinopril are both available for oral use.

Oral tablets of lisinopril are taken to treat hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, as well as heart failure. You have a better chance of surviving a heart attack if you take it, which is another reason why people take it.

Warnings of vital importance

FDA Warnings

This medication comes with a black box warning. These are the FDA’s most urgent safety alerts, and you should take them very seriously (FDA). A boxed warning serves to inform both medical professionals and patients about potential adverse effects associated with a medication.

If you are pregnant or have any plans to become pregnant, you should not use this medication. This medicine poses a risk to the health of your unborn child and could even be fatal. If you become pregnant while using this medication, you should contact your healthcare provider as soon as possible. Talk to your prenatal care provider about additional strategies to bring down your blood pressure while you’re expecting.

Display more

Angioedema, often known as swelling, can be brought on by using this medication. Symptoms include sudden swelling of the face, arms, legs, lips, tongue, throat, and intestines. This could prove to be fatal. If you are experiencing swelling or abdominal pain, you should contact your doctor as soon as possible. You will be weaned off of this medicine and may be given another that may help lessen the swelling in your body. While you are taking this medication, there is always the possibility that you could experience swelling. If you have a family history of angioedema or if you are Black, your risk may be higher of developing this condition.

Hypotension, often known as low blood pressure, is a side effect that may occur as a result of taking this medication, particularly in the initial few days of treatment. If you are feeling lightheaded, dizzy, or as if you are going to pass out, you should contact your doctor immediately. If any of the following apply to you, you may have a higher risk of having low blood pressure:

aren’t drinking enough fluids

are producing a lot of sweat

have stomach upset or are throwing up

suffer from heart failure.

dialyze their kidneys

Consume some diuretics.

This medication has the potential to induce a cough that does not go away. When you quit taking the prescription, you won’t have to worry about this cough anymore.

DO NOT MISS: Topamax oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions & more

What does lisinopril stand for?

A doctor’s prescription is required for lisinopril. Tablets for oral consumption and a liquid form are both available.

The oral tablet formulation of lisinopril is marketed under the brand names Prinivil and Zestril. A generic version of the medication is also on the market. The cost of generic medications is typically lower. It’s possible that they won’t be offered in the same dosage strengths or forms as the branded version in some circumstances.

Why it’s put to use

The oral tablet form of the medication lisinopril is used to treat excessive blood pressure as well as heart failure. You have a better chance of surviving a heart attack if you take it, which is another reason why people take it.

It is possible to use this medication in conjunction with other treatments. Because of this, you might need to combine it with other medications.

The workings of it

An angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is a type of medication that belongs to the same family as lisinopril.

A group of different pharmaceuticals that share a common mode of action is referred to as a class of drugs. They have a comparable chemical structure and are frequently employed in the treatment of conditions that are analogous to one another.

This medication causes the blood vessels in your body to become more relaxed. Both the strain on your heart and your blood pressure will decrease as a result of this.

Lisinopril side effects

The oral tablet form of lisinopril does not have any sedative effects. On the other hand, it can result in low blood pressure. This may cause you to feel lightheaded or faint. Until you know how this medication affects you, you shouldn’t engage in any tasks that require you to be aware, such as driving or operating machinery. Additional adverse effects have been reported with the use of lisinopril.

More common side effects

The following are some of the most prevalent adverse reactions that can be brought on by taking lisinopril:

headache

dizziness

recurrent hacking cough

a lowering in the blood pressure

chest pain

In the event that these side effects are not severe, it is possible that they will disappear in a matter of days or weeks. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist if the symptoms become more severe or if they do not go away.

Serious adverse effects may result.

If you are experiencing major adverse effects, you should contact your physician as soon as possible. In the event that your symptoms appear to be life-threatening or if you believe you may be experiencing a medical emergency, dial 911 immediately. The following is a list of potentially serious side effects and the symptoms they cause:

hypersensitive reaction, often known as an allergic reaction. Among the symptoms are:

symptoms including puffiness in the cheeks, lips, tongue, or throat

a difficult time breathing

a difficult time swallowing

abdominal (stomach) pain that may or may not is accompanied by nausea or vomiting

renal issues. Among the symptoms are:

tiredness

swollen extremities, most notably your hands, feet, and ankles

a feeling of difficulty breathing

weight increase

liver failure. Among the symptoms are:

skin discolouration and a whiter appearance to the whites of your eyes

increased liver enzymes

stomach discomfort

feeling queasy and throwing up

high concentrations of potassium This medication has the potential to induce dangerously high potassium levels. This can result in an irregular heartbeat (heart rate or rhythm problems). If you have kidney disease, diabetes, or if you are on any other medications that raise potassium levels, your risk may be significantly increased.

Please understand that our intention is to present you with the most recent and pertinent information possible. However, due to the fact that medications have varying effects on different people, we are unable to guarantee that this material covers all of the potential adverse effects. This information is not intended to replace professional medical advice in any way. Always have a conversation about potential adverse effects with a medical expert who is familiar with your medical history.

YOU MAY LIKE THIS: Cefuroxime | Side Effects, Dosage, Uses & More

Lisinopril might have an effect on the way other drugs work.

The oral tablet form of the prescription lisinopril can have an effect on how other drugs, herbs, or vitamins your body processes. When one substance alters the functioning of another, this is known as an interaction. This could be dangerous to you or reduce the effectiveness of the medications that you are currently taking.

Your physician should carefully monitor all of your medications in order to help prevent interactions between them. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you have any questions about how this medication might interact with other medications that you are currently taking.

The following is a list of some of the medications that are known to have the potential to interact negatively with lisinopril.

Blood pressure medications

Lisinopril can raise your chance of developing low blood pressure, high blood potassium levels, and renal issues, including kidney failure, when taken in combination with certain blood pressure medications. Among these medications are:

drugs that inhibit the angiotensin receptors (ARB). Examples include:

candesartan

irbesartan

losartan

olmesartan

telmisartan

valsartan

azilsartan

inhibitors of the enzyme angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Examples include:

benazepril

captopril

enalapril

fosinopril

lisinopril

moexipril

perindopril

quinapril

ramipril

trandolapril

inhibitors of the enzyme renin

aliskiren

Diabetes medicines

Taking lisinopril in conjunction with diabetic medication can result in an excessively low blood sugar level. Among these medications are:

insulins

oral diabetes medications

Water pills (diuretics)

Combining lisinopril with other medications that cause dehydration can result in dangerously low blood pressure. Among these medications are:

hydrochlorothiazide

chlorthalidone

furosemide

bumetanide

Supplements of potassium and diuretics that spare potassium are two options.

Increasing the amount of potassium in your body can be accomplished by either taking potassium supplements or potassium-sparing diuretics in conjunction with lisinopril. Among these medications are:

spironolactone

amiloride

triamterene

Mood stabiliser medications

The effects of lithium may be amplified by the use of lisinopril. This indicates that you could have a greater number of adverse effects.

Pain medications

It is possible that your kidney function will deteriorate if you take lisinopril in conjunction with some medications that assist reduce pain. Among these medications are:

NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, include the following:

ibuprofen

naproxen

diclofenac

indomethacin

ketoprofen

ketorolac

sulindac

flurbiprofen

HERE MORE: Prochlorperazine Maleate – Uses, Side Effects, and More

Medications that stop organs from rejecting transplants

Combining lisinopril with these other medications increases the likelihood that you could experience angioedema, often known as swelling, which is a serious allergic reaction. Some examples of these medications are as follows:

temsirolimus

sirolimus

everolimus

Gold

Taking lisinopril while also using injectable gold (sodium aurothiomalate) may enhance the likelihood that you will get a nitritoid response. Flushing, which is characterised by a warmth and reddening of the face and cheeks, nausea, vomiting, and low blood pressure are all potential symptoms of this illness.

Inhibitors of the neprilysin pathway

These medications are prescribed to patients who suffer from heart failure. They are not compatible with the use of lisinopril. Lisinopril should not be taken within 36 hours of starting or stopping treatment with a neprilysin inhibitor. Combining these medications raises the likelihood that you will experience angioedema. Suddenly, your face, arms, legs, lips, tongue, throat, or intestines swell up. This condition is called angioedema.

The following are examples of drugs that belong to this class:

sacubitril

Warnings regarding lisinopril

Caution: allergens present

This medication has the potential to trigger a severe allergic reaction. Among the symptoms are:

a difficult time breathing

symptoms including swelling in your throat or tongue

hives

If you have any of these symptoms, you should immediately dial 911 or proceed to the nearest hospital emergency room.

If you have ever experienced an adverse reaction to this medication, you should never take it again. Taking it once again could be your last tragic mistake (cause death).

Warnings for individuals who have the following health conditions:

For patients who have kidney illness: If you have kidney disease or are already undergoing dialysis, you have a significantly increased risk of experiencing certain serious adverse effects when taking this medication. Your kidney function will be monitored by your doctor, who will then alter your prescription as necessary. Your primary care physician needs to start you out on a lesser dose of this medication.

This medication may have an effect on the amount of sugar in your blood if you have diabetes. It is possible that the dose of diabetic medication that your doctor prescribes for you will need to be adjusted. Your physician will let you know how frequently you should check your blood sugar levels.

Cautionary notes for members of other groups

This medication should not be taken by women who are pregnant since it may have an adverse effect on the development of the foetus. Lisinopril should never be administered to a pregnant woman unless it is absolutely necessary to address a life-threatening disease that the mother is suffering from.

Talk to your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or if you are thinking about becoming pregnant. Talk to your prenatal care provider about the specific risks that your unborn child may face as a result of the situation. It is only appropriate to use this medication during pregnancy if the potential benefits of the treatment outweigh the potential risks to the foetus.

Women who are breastfeeding should be aware that it is unknown whether or not this medication is excreted into breast milk. In the event that it does, it has the potential to induce adverse consequences in a child who is being breastfed. If you plan to nurse your child, you should discuss this with your physician. It is possible that you will need to make a choice between discontinuing nursing and terminating treatment with this medicine.

For seniors: It’s possible that older folks digest medications at a slower rate. It’s possible that a typical dose for an adult will cause your body to produce abnormally high levels of this substance. If you are an elderly patient, your doctor may recommend a lesser dosage or a different administration schedule.

This medicine should not be given to children younger than 6 years old because it has not been tested on that age group and there is no evidence that it is safe for them.

It’s possible that this medicine won’t be as effective at lowering blood pressure in black patients as it is in white patients. Lisinopril may be combined with other medications at your doctor’s discretion. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any concerns or inquiries.

How to take lisinopril

This dosing information pertains to the oral tablet version of lisinopril. It’s probable that not all imaginable dosages and forms have been mentioned here. Your physician will advise you on the appropriate dosage for you to take. Your dose, the form it takes, and how often you take it will vary depending on the following factors:

your age, the ailment being treated, the severity of your condition, and any other medical issues you have or other medical disorders you have your response to the initial dose to consider.

ALSO READ: Levetiracetam Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions & more

Structures and capabilities

Generic: lisinopril

Form: Oral pill

Strengths: 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg

Manufacturer: Prinivil

Form: Oral pill

Strengths: 5 mg, 40 mg

Brand: Zestril

Tablets to be taken orally.

Strengths: 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg

Dosage for hypertension (high blood pressure)

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Initial dosing is 10 milligrammes, to be given orally once per day.

Usual dosage: 20–40 mg administered once per day.

Maximum dosage: 80 milligrammes administered once per day.

Child dose (ages 6–17 years)

Initial dosage is 0.07 milligrammes per kilogramme of body weight, up to 5 milligrammes, to be given orally once daily.

Adjustments to the dosage will be made according to how your blood pressure reacts to the medication.

Maximum dosage: 0.61 mg/kg, up to 40 mg, once per day.

Child dose (ages 0–5 years)

This drug should not be given to children younger than 6 years old because it has not been evaluated on this age group.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

There are no particular recommendations on the dosage for seniors. It’s possible that older folks digest medications at a slower rate. It’s possible that a typical dose for an adult will cause your body to produce abnormally high levels of this substance. If you are an elderly patient, your doctor may recommend a lesser dosage or a different administration schedule.

Typical dosage for congestive heart failure

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

Initial dosing is 5 milligrammes, to be taken orally once per day.

Maximum dosage: 40 milligrammes administered once per day.

Child dose (ages 0–17 years)

Since heart failure in children under the age of 18 has not been adequately researched, this medicine should not be given to those patients.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

There are no particular recommendations on the dosage for seniors. It’s possible that older folks digest medications at a slower rate. It’s possible that a typical dose for an adult will cause your body to produce abnormally high levels of this substance. If you are an elderly patient, your doctor may recommend a lesser dosage or a different administration schedule.

The recommended dosage for patients with acute myocardial infarction (heart attack)

Adult dosage (ages 18–64 years)

The initial dosage is 5 milligrammes to be given orally within the first twenty-four hours of the onset of symptoms of a heart attack. After another twenty-four hours, your physician will provide another 5 mg to you.

The typical dose is 10 milligrammes, taken by mouth 48 hours after a heart attack. After that, one 10 mg dose once daily for a minimum of six weeks.

Dosage for children (ages 0–17 years)

As a result of a lack of research, this medicine, which is intended to increase the likelihood of survival following a heart attack, should not be given to children less than 18 years old.

Senior dosage (ages 65 years and older)

There are no particular recommendations on the dosage for seniors. It’s possible that older folks digest medications at a slower rate. It’s possible that a typical dose for an adult will cause your body to produce abnormally high levels of this substance. If you are an elderly patient, your doctor may recommend a lesser dosage or a different administration schedule.

Special considerations

Patients with heart failure and low blood salt levels may begin treatment with a beginning dose of 2.5 mg administered once daily.

In order to increase the likelihood of survival after a heart attack, your initial dose may be reduced to 2.5 mg for the first three days following the event. This is the case if you have low blood pressure.

Please understand that our intention is to present you with the most recent and pertinent information possible. However, due to the fact that medications have varying effects on various people, we are unable to guarantee that this list contains all of the possible dosages. This information is not intended to replace professional medical advice in any way. Always with your primary care physician or pharmacist on the dosages that are appropriate for you.

Take exactly as directed.

A tablet form of lisinopril is used orally for the purpose of long-term therapy. If you don’t take this medication exactly as directed, you put yourself at considerable risk.

In the event that you do not take it at all: In the event that you do not take it at any time, your blood pressure will remain elevated. Your risk of having a heart attack or a stroke will increase as a result of this.

If you suddenly stop using it, your blood pressure may skyrocket. If you suddenly stop taking this medication, your blood pressure may skyrocket. Anxiety, profuse sweating, and a racing heart rate are all potential side effects of this.

If you don’t take it when you’re supposed to, you might not notice any difference in how it makes you feel, but your blood pressure might not be as well controlled. Because of this, you may have an increased chance of having a heart attack or a stroke.

In the event that you forget to take your medication at the prescribed time, you should take it as soon as you remember it. If it will be just a few hours before the next time you are supposed to take your dose, then you should hold off and take only one dose at that time. Under no circumstances should you attempt to catch up by taking two doses at once. This could have potentially harmful repercussions on the body.

If you take an excessive amount of this medication, you run the risk of experiencing a decrease in your blood pressure. It’s possible that this will make you pass out. Act immediately if you believe that you have taken an unsafe amount of the medicine. Make a trip to the nearest emergency room, call your primary care physician or the poison control centre in your area, or both.

How to detect if this medication is helping you: In order to determine whether or not this medication is helping you, your doctor will monitor your blood pressure as well as any other symptoms related to your illness. If you check your blood pressure and find that it has dropped, this could be another indication that the medication is doing its job.

Important things to think about before starting this medication

If your physician prescribes lisinopril oral pill for you, keep these things in mind as you take the medication.

General

It is important to take this medication at approximately the same time each day. You have the option of crushing or cutting the tablet.

Storage

The ideal range is between 59 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit (15 and 30 degrees Celsius).

Your medications should not be stored in the bathroom or any other area that has a chance of getting wet. Keep this medication in an area that is free from moisture and dampness.

Refills

This drug requires a prescription, however it can be refilled.

It should not be necessary for you to provide a new prescription in order to have this medication refilled. On your prescription, your physician will indicate the maximum number of refills that are permitted.

Travel

If you are going to travel with your medication, you should:

Always have it on you, either in your person or in a carry-on bag.

You don’t need to be concerned about the X-ray machines at the airport. They won’t have any effect on the medication you take.

It is possible that airport security personnel will ask to see the prescription label for the medication you are carrying with you. Always make sure you have the original box with the prescription label on it.

It is important not to leave this medication in the automobile, particularly if the temperature is extremely high or low.

Self-management

Your doctor may ask you to perform blood pressure checks at home on a regular basis. You will need to invest in a home blood pressure monitor in order to accomplish this goal. These are stocked at most drugstores and retail outlets. You should record your blood pressure readings in a log that includes the date, the time of day, and the readings themselves. Bring this journal with you to each of your sessions with the doctor.

Clinical monitoring

Before beginning therapy with this medication, as well as periodically throughout treatment, your physician may do the following tests to determine whether or not this medication is effective and whether or not it is safe for you to take:

blood pressure liver function

potassium levels in the blood renal function

Hidden expenses

If you want to check your blood pressure at home, you might need to invest in a blood pressure monitor.

Are there any other options available?

There are additional medications that can be used to treat your illness. It’s possible that some will work better for you than others. Talk to your healthcare provider about any alternative treatment options that might be appropriate for you.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.