Loperamide Oral Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures & more

Loperamide Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures & more

Loperamide Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures & more

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Uses

Please also see the section labelled Warning. This drug can be used to treat acute diarrhoea, as well as diarrhoea that occurs when travelling. It does this by reducing the amount of movement that occurs in the digestive tract. This results in a reduction in the total number of bowel motions and drying out of the stool. In patients who have had an ileostomy procedure, loperamide can also be used to lessen the amount of discharge that is produced. Additionally, it is utilised in the treatment of persistent diarrhoea in patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel disease.

Loperamide is only effective in treating the symptoms of diarrhoea and not the underlying cause of the condition (such as infection). Your physician has to discover the origin of the diarrhoea in order to properly treat any additional symptoms you may be experiencing.

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The proper application of Loperamide

Please also see the section labelled Warning.

Before you take this medication, make sure you have read all of the guidelines that are printed on the product packaging. This is especially important if you are treating yourself with an over-the-counter product. If your physician has recommended this medication for you, make sure to follow both the instructions that your physician has given you and the ones that are printed on the label of your prescription.

This medication should be taken orally, preferably after each loose bowel movement, or as directed by your doctor. Your current condition and how well you respond to treatment will determine the dosage. When it comes to children, the dosage is determined not only by age but also by weight. If an adult is treating themselves, they should not take more than 8 milligrammes in 24 hours; however, if they are under the advice of a physician, they should take 16 milligrammes in 24 hours.

Take this prescription on an empty stomach if you are chewing the pill instead of swallowing it whole. Before swallowing, the chewable pills need to have a good deal of their substance chewed up.

If you are going to be using pills that dissolve very quickly, make sure that your hands are completely dry before you open the blister pack and take out one of the tablets. It is important to refrain from trying to force the tablet through the blister pack. Put the tablet on your tongue, wait for it to completely dissolve, and then swallow it with your saliva when you’ve done so. Before taking the tablet, it should not be broken, crushed, or divided in any way. Do not take the tablet out of its blister pack until right before you are ready to take it. To take this medication, you do not need to drink any water.

Dehydration is a potential side effect of diarrhoea. Replace what you’ve lost by chugging a lot of fluids and minerals (electrolytes) in your body. Notify your primary care provider without delay if you begin to experience symptoms of dehydration (such as extreme thirst, decreased urination, muscle cramps, weakness, or fainting). It is possible that at this period you may need to switch to a diet that is low in acidic foods in order to lessen the irritation that is being caused to your stomach and intestines. For further information, please speak with either your physician or pharmacist.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve after two days, if it gets worse, or if you develop new symptoms. Diarrhoea that does not improve after two days. Seek emergency medical assistance if you notice blood in your stool, a fever, an uncomfortable fullness or swelling of the stomach or abdomen, or if you have any other symptoms that lead you to suspect that you may be suffering from a serious medical condition.

If your doctor has directed you to take this medication in order to treat continuing diarrhoea, you are required to inform your physician if your condition does not improve after undergoing therapy for ten days.

Side Effects

There is a possibility that you will have constipation, drowsiness, weariness, and dizziness. Get in touch with your healthcare provider as soon as possible if any of these symptoms continue or become worse.

If your physician has recommended that you take this drug, keep in mind that he or she has done so on the basis of the assessment that the potential benefits to you outweigh the potential risks. The majority of persons who take this medicine do not report experiencing any severe adverse effects.

If you experience any very serious side effects while taking this medication, such as severe constipation, nausea, or vomiting, stomach or abdominal pain, uncomfortable fullness of the stomach or abdomen, fast or irregular heartbeat, severe dizziness, or fainting, you should immediately seek medical assistance and stop taking this medication.

It is quite unusual for this medicine to cause an extremely severe allergic reaction. However, you should seek immediate medical attention if you observe any symptoms of a major allergic response, such as a rash, itching/swelling (particularly of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, or difficulty breathing. These symptoms include:

This list of potential adverse effects is not exhaustive in any way. Please consult your physician or pharmacist if you have any side effects that are not listed above.

In the United States, if you are experiencing any adverse effects, please consult your primary care physician. You can call the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or visit their website at www.fda.gov/medwatch to report any adverse effects.

In Canada, if you are experiencing any adverse effects, please consult your primary care physician. You can call Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345 to report any adverse effects you experience.

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Precautions

Inform your doctor or pharmacist that you are allergic to loperamide, as well as to any other allergies you may have, before beginning treatment with the medication. There is a possibility that this product contains inactive substances, which, if present, could result in allergic responses or other complications. Discuss the matter further with your pharmacist for further information.

Before using this drug, you should discuss your condition with your physician or pharmacist if you have any of the following health issues: pain in the stomach or abdomen without diarrhoea, bowel obstruction (such as ileus, megacolon, or abdominal distention), black or tarry stools, blood or mucus in the stool, high fever, HIV infection or AIDS, liver problems, certain infections of the stomach or intestines (such as Salmonella or Shigella), and a specific type of bowel disease are all potential causes (acute ulcerative colitis).

There is a possibility that the tablets that dissolve very quickly include aspartame or phenylalanine. Consult your physician or pharmacist if you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to limit the amount of aspartame or phenylalanine you consume in order to stay healthy. They will be able to advise you on how to use this medication safely.

Antibiotics carry with them the remote possibility of triggering a serious intestinal illness brought on by a bacteria known as C. difficile. Symptoms may include uncontrollable diarrhoea, pain or cramping in the abdominal region or stomach, or the presence of blood or mucus in the stool. This syndrome may manifest itself at any time during therapy or anywhere from a few weeks to several months after treatment has been completed. It’s possible that this medicine will make the illness much more severe. If you have any of the symptoms listed above, including recent use of an antibiotic, you should not use an anti-diarrhoea product without first consulting your physician. This is very important.

The drug loperamide has been linked to a disorder that alters the normal beat of the heart (QT prolongation). Rarely, a QT prolongation can produce a dangerous (and in extremely rare cases, fatal) fast or irregular heartbeat, in addition to other symptoms (such as severe dizziness and fainting) that require immediate medical attention.

If you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that can cause QT prolongation, your risk of developing the condition may be enhanced. Inform your doctor or pharmacist of all the medications you are currently taking, as well as if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), a family history of certain heart problems, and so on before beginning treatment with loperamide (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Your chance of having your QT interval becomes prolonged may also be increased if your blood potassium or magnesium levels are low. This risk may be increased if you use certain medications (such as diuretics or “water pills”) or if you have conditions like as intense sweating, diarrhoea, or vomiting. Likewise, this risk may be increased if you use certain drugs. Discuss the use of loperamide in a safe manner with your attending physician.

This medication could cause you to feel lightheaded or sleepy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not get behind the wheel of a vehicle, operate any machinery, or engage in any activity that requires attentiveness until you are able to do so safely. Steer clear of beverages containing alcohol. If you are a marijuana user, you should consult your primary care physician (cannabis).

It’s possible that older persons are more sensitive to the adverse effects of this medication, particularly the QT prolongation (see above).

It is possible that children are more vulnerable to the side effects of this medication, particularly sleepiness. Dehydration is another health concern that is more common among children. Please also refer to the sections titled “Warning” and “How to Use.”

During pregnancy, it is important to only use this drug when it is absolutely necessary. Talk to your healthcare provider about the potential drawbacks and advantages.

This medication does get into breast milk, but it is highly unlikely that it will have any negative effects on an infant who is being breastfed. Before starting to breastfeed, you should talk to your healthcare provider.

Interactions

Inform your doctor or pharmacist that you are allergic to loperamide, as well as to any other allergies you may have, before beginning treatment with the medication. There is a possibility that this product contains inactive substances, which, if present, could result in allergic responses or other complications. Discuss the matter further with your pharmacist for further information.

Before using this drug, you should discuss your condition with your physician or pharmacist if you have any of the following health issues: pain in the stomach or abdomen without diarrhoea, bowel obstruction (such as ileus, megacolon, or abdominal distention), black or tarry stools, blood or mucus in the stool, high fever, HIV infection or AIDS, liver problems, certain infections of the stomach or intestines (such as Salmonella or Shigella), and a specific type of bowel disease are all potential causes (acute ulcerative colitis).

There is a possibility that the tablets that dissolve very quickly include aspartame or phenylalanine. Consult your physician or pharmacist if you have phenylketonuria (PKU) or any other condition that requires you to limit the amount of aspartame or phenylalanine you consume in order to stay healthy. They will be able to advise you on how to use this medication safely.

Antibiotics carry with them the remote possibility of triggering a serious intestinal illness brought on by a bacteria known as C. difficile. Symptoms may include uncontrollable diarrhoea, pain or cramping in the abdominal region or stomach, or the presence of blood or mucus in the stool. This syndrome may manifest itself at any time during therapy or anywhere from a few weeks to several months after treatment has been completed. It’s possible that this medicine will make the illness much more severe. If you have any of the symptoms listed above, including recent use of an antibiotic, you should not use an anti-diarrhoea product without first consulting your physician. This is very important.

The drug loperamide has been linked to a disorder that alters the normal beat of the heart (QT prolongation). Rarely, a QT prolongation can produce a dangerous (and in extremely rare cases, fatal) fast or irregular heartbeat, in addition to other symptoms (such as severe dizziness and fainting) that require immediate medical attention.

If you have certain medical conditions or are taking other drugs that can cause QT prolongation, your risk of developing the condition may be enhanced. Inform your doctor or pharmacist of all the medications you are currently taking, as well as if you have any of the following conditions: certain heart problems (heart failure, slow heartbeat, QT prolongation in the EKG), a family history of certain heart problems, and so on before beginning treatment with loperamide (QT prolongation in the EKG, sudden cardiac death).

Your chance of having your QT interval becomes prolonged may also be increased if your blood potassium or magnesium levels are low. This risk may be increased if you use certain medications (such as diuretics or “water pills”) or if you have conditions like as intense sweating, diarrhoea, or vomiting. Likewise, this risk may be increased if you use certain drugs. Discuss the use of loperamide in a safe manner with your attending physician.

This medication could cause you to feel lightheaded or sleepy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not get behind the wheel of a vehicle, operate any machinery, or engage in any activity that requires attentiveness until you are able to do so safely. Steer clear of beverages containing alcohol. If you are a marijuana user, you should consult your primary care physician (cannabis).

It’s possible that older persons are more sensitive to the adverse effects of this medication, particularly the QT prolongation (see above).

It is possible that children are more vulnerable to the side effects of this medication, particularly sleepiness. Dehydration is another health concern that is more common among children. Please also refer to the sections titled “Warning” and “How to Use.”

During pregnancy, it is important to only use this drug when it is absolutely necessary. Talk to your healthcare provider about the potential drawbacks and advantages.

This medication does get into breast milk, but it is highly unlikely that it will have any negative effects on an infant who is being breastfed. Before starting to breastfeed, you should talk to your healthcare provider.

Overdose

Dial 911 if you suspect that someone has overdosed and they are exhibiting serious symptoms such as passing out or having problems breathing. In any other case, you should immediately contact a poison control centre. To reach the poison control centre for your area in the United States, dial 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents can call a provincial poison control centre. Overdose can cause a variety of symptoms, including difficulty urinating, slow or shallow breathing, profound sleep, rapid or irregular pulse, severe dizziness, and even fainting.

Warnings

If your physician has prescribed this prescription for you, do not give it to anybody else even if they ask for it.

Neglected Dose

If you are taking this medication on a regular schedule (not “as required”) and you forget to take a dose, you should take it as soon as you remember it because it could have serious consequences. If it is getting close to the time of the next dose, you should forgo the dose that you missed. Your next dose should be taken at the typical time. It is not necessary to double the dose in order to catch up.

Storage

Keep at room temperature and away from light and moisture. Store at room temperature. Keep away from the bathroom at all costs. Always make sure that children and animals are kept well away from any medications.

Unless you have been specifically told to do so, you should not flush drugs down the toilet or pour them down a drain. When it is no longer needed or has passed its expiration date, dispose of this product in the appropriate manner. Talk to your neighbourhood pharmacy or the firm that handles garbage disposal in your area.

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