Calcium - Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Calcium – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Calcium – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

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Overview

Calcium is an essential vitamin that may be found in a wide variety of meals, including items made from dairy. More than 99% of the body’s calcium can be found in the teeth and bones of the human body.

The bones in your body are constantly remodelling themselves. Calcium is necessary for this process, but as we get older, the amount of calcium that our bodies naturally contain tends to decrease. Consuming an adequate amount of calcium allows the bones to repair themselves and maintain their strength. Calcium is essential for many bodily functions, including those of the heart, neurons, and blood-clotting systems.

Oral calcium supplementation is a standard practice among patients seeking therapy or prevention of low calcium levels, muscle cramps, osteoporosis, softening of the bones, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It is also used for the treatment of high blood pressure, cancer, stroke, and a variety of other illnesses; however, there is insufficient reliable scientific data to support the majority of these additional uses.

Both the United States and Canada allow the labelling of foods that include calcium and vitamin D with the claim that they may lower the risk of developing osteoporosis.

What Are the Benefits and Applications?

Beneficial for Treating Indigestion (dyspepsia). Calcium carbonate can be effectively used as a treatment for indigestion when it is taken orally in the form of an antacid.

Increased potassium concentrations in the blood (hyperkalemia). Calcium gluconate administered intravenously has been shown to reverse heart issues brought on by high potassium levels. Only a trained medical professional should administer IV medications.

a calcium deficiency characterised by low blood levels (hypocalcemia). It is possible to effectively treat and prevent low calcium levels by administering calcium both orally and intravenously. Only a trained medical professional should administer IV medications.

Failure of the kidneys In patients who have kidney failure, taking calcium carbonate or calcium acetate orally is an effective method for reducing high levels of phosphate that are seen in the blood. People who have kidney failure may potentially benefit from taking calcium in pill form because it appears to help lower blood pressure.

Likely efficient in regard to

People who use medications called corticosteroids are more likely to experience bone loss. Oral use of calcium and vitamin D appears to slow the rate of bone density loss in patients who use corticosteroid medicines for an extended period of time.

Parathyroid that is overactive (hyperparathyroidism). People who have kidney failure and parathyroid hormone levels that are too high can lower their levels of the hormone by taking calcium orally.

Fragile and fragile bone tissue (osteoporosis). Both stopping bone loss and treating osteoporosis can be accomplished by taking in a suitable amount of calcium through one’s diet as well as through the use of dietary supplements. People who have osteoporosis can benefit from taking calcium in pill form, either on its own or in combination with vitamin D, as this helps to reduce the risk of fractures.

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It has been found that getting a suitable amount of calcium through one’s diet as well as through dietary supplements can greatly lessen the severity of mood swings, bloating, food cravings, and pain.

It is possible that this treatment will be effective for colon and rectal cancer. It appears that reducing the risk of colorectal cancer can be accomplished either by increasing calcium consumption through food or by taking calcium supplements orally. Calcium supplements do not appear to be beneficial for persons who have low levels of vitamin D, nor do they appear to be beneficial for people who are overweight or obese.

Developing a baby’s bone density and strength while they are still in the womb. When the mother’s diet does not include enough amount of calcium, oral calcium supplementation during pregnancy can help boost the bone mineral density of the developing infant.

Elevated levels of blood pressure. People who have high blood pressure and people who do not have high blood pressure appear to have a slight reduction in their blood pressure after taking calcium supplements orally.

The bones have become more pliable (osteomalacia). Oral calcium supplementation appears to be effective in reversing the bone softening that can result from a diet that is deficient in calcium.

A condition that can occur during pregnancy and is characterised by elevated blood pressure and the presence of protein in the urine (pre-eclampsia). It has been found that ingesting between one and two grammes of calcium on a daily basis can lower the chance of developing high blood pressure connected to pregnancy. Those individuals who are at high risk and have low calcium levels appear to benefit from it the most.

In youngsters, a softening of the bones that is frequently caused by a lack of vitamin D. (rickets). Oral calcium supplementation appears to help reverse the weakening of the bones that can occur in youngsters whose diets include very little calcium.

Preventing the loss of teeth (tooth retention). Oral consumption of calcium and vitamin D appears to aid in the prevention of tooth loss in adults of advanced age.

It’s possible that this treatment won’t work for breast cancer. Consuming calcium through the digestive system does not lower the risk of breast cancer.

Fractures. It does not appear that taking calcium in pill form, either by alone or in combination with vitamin D, can prevent fractures in older persons who do not have osteoporosis.

Obesity. It does not appear that ingesting calcium will aid in the process of weight loss.

Any kind of fatality is acceptable. There is no indication that taking calcium supplements orally will lower one’s chance of passing away overall.

Adverse Reactions

When consumed via the oral route: When taken at the recommended levels of between 1000 and 1200 milligrammes per day, calcium is believed to be safe. Calcium is known to produce several mildly unpleasant side effects, including flatulence and belching. However, calcium may pose a health risk if it is consumed in amounts that are greater than the daily maximum recommended intake level (UL). The upper safe limit (UL) for adults 19-50 years old is 2500 mg, and the lower safe limit (UL) for persons over 50 years old is 2000 mg. Taking more than this amount on a daily basis may raise the risk of experiencing major adverse effects.

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Important Safety Instructions and Cautionary Notes:

The experiences of pregnancy and breastfeeding: Calcium, when taken orally at the levels suggested, is probably safe to consume. When calcium is consumed by mouth at levels that are higher than the daily acceptable upper intake level, there is a possibility that it could cause harm (UL). The maximum permitted dosage (MRD) for children under the age of 18 is 3000 mg, while those above the age of 18 can have up to 2500 mg. Infant is more likely to experience seizures if they are given higher amounts. Be sure to take into account your total calcium intake, which should include calcium from both your diet and any supplemental sources. If your doctor hasn’t told you otherwise, you shouldn’t take more than 1,000–1,200 milligrammes of calcium every day from supplements.

Calcium is thought to be safe for consumption by mouth in the doses that are recommended for children. When calcium is consumed by mouth at levels that are higher than the daily acceptable upper intake level, there is a possibility that it could cause harm (UL). The maximum safe dose (UL) is set at 1000 mg for infants aged 0 to 6 months, 1500 mg for children aged 6 to 12 months, 2500 mg for children aged 1 to 8 years, and 3000 mg for adolescents aged 9 to 18 years. Children should get the calcium they need to achieve their daily requirements, but they shouldn’t take in more calcium than they need.

People who have low levels of gastric acid, also known as achlorhydria, absorb less calcium when it is given to them on an empty stomach than when it is given to people with normal levels of gastric acid. Calcium supplements are recommended to be taken with meals for people who have low acid levels.

An excessively high calcium level in the blood (as seen in conditions affecting the parathyroid gland and sarcoidosis): If you have a condition that causes your calcium levels to be too high, you should avoid calcium as much as possible. Taking calcium supplements can cause levels of calcium to rise even higher than they would otherwise.

People who already have kidney problems should avoid taking calcium supplements since they can cause their calcium levels to reach unhealthy levels. Before beginning to take calcium supplements, you should consult your primary care physician.

People who smoke absorb less calcium from their stomachs, so they may need to take calcium supplements to make up for the difference.

People who have had a stroke and have used calcium supplements for a period of at least five years may have an increased risk of getting dementia. After a stroke, there is a need for additional research to determine whether or not calcium supplements should be avoided.

Important Safety Instructions and Cautionary Notes

Calcium is considered to be safe for oral consumption when it is used in the suggested levels of between 1000 and 1200 milligrammes on a daily basis. Calcium is known to produce several mildly unpleasant side effects, including flatulence and belching. However, calcium may pose a health risk if it is consumed in amounts that are greater than the daily maximum recommended intake level (UL). The upper safe limit (UL) for adults 19-50 years old is 2500 mg, and the lower safe limit (UL) for persons over 50 years old is 2000 mg. Taking more than this amount on a daily basis may raise the risk of experiencing major adverse effects.

The experiences of pregnancy and breastfeeding: Calcium, when taken orally at the levels suggested, is probably safe to consume. When calcium is consumed by mouth at levels that are higher than the daily acceptable upper intake level, there is a possibility that it could cause harm (UL). The maximum permitted dosage (MRD) for children under the age of 18 is 3000 mg, while those above the age of 18 can have up to 2500 mg.

Infant is more likely to experience seizures if they are given higher amounts. Be sure to take into account your total calcium intake, which should include calcium from both your diet and any supplemental sources. If your doctor hasn’t told you otherwise, you shouldn’t take more than 1,000–1,200 milligrammes of calcium every day from supplements.

Calcium is thought to be safe for consumption by mouth in the doses that are recommended for children. When calcium is consumed by mouth at levels that are higher than the daily acceptable upper intake level, there is a possibility that it could cause harm (UL). The maximum safe dose (UL) is set at 1000 mg for infants aged 0 to 6 months, 1500 mg for children aged 6 to 12 months, 2500 mg for children aged 1 to 8 years, and 3000 mg for adolescents aged 9 to 18 years. Children should get the calcium they need to achieve their daily requirements, but they shouldn’t take in more calcium than they need.

People who have low levels of gastric acid, also known as achlorhydria, absorb less calcium when it is given to them on an empty stomach than when it is given to people with normal levels of gastric acid. Calcium supplements are recommended to be taken with meals for people who have low acid levels.

An excessively high calcium level in the blood (as seen in conditions affecting the parathyroid gland and sarcoidosis): If you have a condition that causes your calcium levels to be too high, you should avoid calcium as much as possible. Taking calcium supplements can cause levels of calcium to rise even higher than they would otherwise.

People who already have kidney problems should avoid taking calcium supplements since they can cause their calcium levels to reach unhealthy levels. Before beginning to take calcium supplements, you should consult your primary care physician.

People who smoke absorb less calcium from their stomachs, so they may need to take calcium supplements to make up for the difference.

People who have had a stroke and have used calcium supplements for a period of at least five years may have an increased risk of getting dementia. After a stroke, there is a need for additional research to determine whether or not calcium supplements should be avoided.

What are the interactions?

Significant Participation

Do not combine these medications in any way.

There is an interaction between ceftriaxone (Rocephin) and calcium.

When given intravenously combined, the antibiotic ceftriaxone and the mineral calcium can cause damage to the lungs and kidneys that is potentially fatal. It is not recommended to give calcium intravenously within the first 48 hours after receiving intravenous ceftriaxone. When calcium is consumed orally, there is no risk associated with this combination.

Tivicay (dolutegravir) has a drug interaction with calcium.

Dolutegravir blood levels can be lowered by concurrent calcium consumption if the two are taken together. It’s possible that this will make dolutegravir less effective. Dolutegravir should be administered either two hours before or six hours after calcium in order to prevent this interaction from occurring.

Elvitegravir (Vitekta) has been shown to have an interaction with CALCIUM.

The blood concentration of elvitegravir can be lowered by taking calcium at the same time as elvitegravir. It’s possible that this will lessen the effects of elvitegravir. To prevent the negative effects of this interaction, elvitegravir should be given either two hours before calcium or two hours after calcium.

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Interaction that is Not Overbearing

Take precautions when using these two together.

There is an interaction between antibiotics (quinolone antibiotics) and calcium.

It’s possible that calcium will make some antibiotics less effective. Calcium has the ability to bind to a class of antibiotics called “quinolones” in the gut. This may result in a reduction in the amount of these medications that are absorbed by the body. To prevent the adverse effects of this interaction, take these medications at least two hours before calcium or between four and six hours after calcium.

Interactions between antibiotics (specifically tetracycline antibiotics) and calcium

It’s possible that calcium will make some antibiotics less effective. Calcium has the ability to bind to a class of antibiotics called tetracyclines in the gut. This may result in a reduction in the amount of these medications that are absorbed by the body. To prevent the adverse effects of this interaction, take these medications at least two hours before calcium or between four and six hours after calcium.

There is an interaction between calcium and bisphosphonates.

Calcium has the ability to lessen the amount of bisphosphonate that is absorbed by the body, which in turn can lessen the effects of bisphosphonates. Bisphosphonates should be taken at least 30 minutes before calcium, or at a different time of day, to prevent this interaction from occurring.

Calcipotriene, also known as Dovonex, has an effect on calcium.

Calcipotriene is a medication that functions in a manner comparable to that of vitamin D. Calcium is more easily absorbed by the body when vitamin D is present. Combining calcipotriene with calcium supplements could result in dangerously high levels of calcium in the body.

Calcium and digoxin (also known as Lanoxin) interact.

Calcium has the potential to influence your heart. Digoxin is a medication that can assist in making your heart beat more strongly. When calcium is used with digoxin, the effects of digoxin could become more pronounced, which could result in an irregular heartbeat. If you are currently on digoxin, you should consult your physician before beginning any calcium supplementation.

Diltiazem, also known by its brand name Cardizem, has an interaction with calcium.

It is possible that the effects of diltiazem will be lessened if the medication is taken in conjunction with substantial doses of calcium.

Calcium and levothyroxine (Synthroid and other brands) interact with one another.

Calcium has the potential to lessen the amount of levothyroxine that is absorbed by the body. It is possible that taking calcium in conjunction with levothyroxine will lessen the effectiveness of levothyroxine. It is recommended to wait at least 4 hours between taking levothyroxine and calcium.

Calcium has an effect on the drug sotalol (Betapace).

Taking calcium at the same time as sotalol may result in a reduction in the amount of sotalol that is absorbed by the body. It’s possible that taking calcium while also taking sotalol will make the drug less effective. Calcium should be taken no less than two hours before or no less than four hours after sotalol for this interaction to be avoided.

Calan and other forms of verapamil have been shown to interact with calcium.

It is possible that the benefits of verapamil will be lessened if significant amounts of calcium are taken at the same time.

Thiazide diuretics, also known as water pills, have been shown to interact with calcium.

Some so-called “water pills” actually work to boost the body’s calcium levels. It is possible to have an excessive amount of calcium in the body if you take a significant quantity of calcium along with some “water tablets.” This could result in major adverse effects, including difficulties with the kidneys.

Calcium and aluminium interact with one another.

Calcium citrate has the potential to boost the amount of aluminium that is absorbed by the body from aluminium hydroxide. This rise in aluminium levels is associated with a higher risk of major adverse effects, particularly in patients already suffering from kidney disease. However, this effect is not produced by all types of calcium. Calcium acetate does not appear to enhance aluminium levels.

Calcium is affected by the presence of lithium.

The usage of lithium for an extended period of time can cause an increase in the calcium level in the blood. Taking calcium supplements along with lithium could cause dangerously high levels of calcium in the body.

Isentress (raltegravir) has a drug interaction with calcium.

Taking calcium in conjunction with raltegravir for an extended period of time may lower blood levels of raltegravir and lessen the effectiveness of the drug. It appears that the blood concentration of raltegravir is unaffected by the consumption of a single dose of calcium in conjunction with raltegravir.

A Slightly Interacting Party

Take caution when using these two together.

Calcium channel blockers, which are prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure, have interaction with CALCIUM.

Calcium channel blockers are one category of medication that can be utilised in the treatment of hypertension. When administered intravenously, calcium may have the potential to reduce the effectiveness of calcium channel blockers. On the other hand, it does not appear that ingesting calcium in the form of calcium supplements or meals containing calcium will have this impact.

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Dosing

Calcium is an essential vitamin that may be found in a wide variety of foods, such as dairy products, kale, broccoli, and citrus juices that have been fortified with calcium. The term “recommended dietary allowance” refers to the quantity that should be ingested on a daily basis at the very least (RDA). The recommended daily allowance (RDA) is 1000 mg for all individuals 19-50 years old and for males 51-70 years old. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for women aged 51 and older is 1200 mg. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for folic acid during pregnancy and breastfeeding is 1300 mg for women under the age of 19 and 1000 mg for women 19 and older. When calculating the RDA for children, age is a factor.

Calcium has traditionally been taken orally by adults in amounts ranging from 500 to 1500 milligrammes on a daily basis when taken in supplement form. If you are not under the guidance of a healthcare expert, you should not take more than 2,000 to 2,500 mg each day. Talk to a medical professional about your symptoms to find out what kind of treatment and dosage would work best for your particular problem.

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