Conjugated Linoleic Acid (Cla) - Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (Cla) – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (Cla) – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

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Overview

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a form of lipid. Dairy and beef are key sources of CLA in the diet. The majority of dietary supplements containing CLA are derived from safflower oil.

CLA has the potential to promote immunological function as well as assist reduce fat accumulation in the body. The normal diet delivers 15-174 mg of CLA per day.

Consumption of CLA for the purpose of reducing body fat is common. It is also often used for bodybuilding and fitness, but there is limited scientific evidence to support these uses.

What Are the Benefits and Applications?

Possibly Effective for

High blood pressure. Taking CLA by mouth along with a drug called ramipril seems to reduce blood pressure more than ramipril alone in people with uncontrolled high blood pressure.

Obesity. Taking CLA by mouth regularly might help lower body fat in adults and children. It’s possible that taking CLA will make you feel less hungry, but it’s unclear whether or not this will make you eat less. The majority of those who use CLA did not experience a reduction in their body weight or body mass index (BMI).

Possible lack of efficacy in treating the common cold. Consuming CLA in pill form does not help prevent the common cold or lessen its symptoms in any way.

Diabetes. Taking CLA by mouth does not improve pre-meal or post-meal blood sugar or insulin levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

High levels of cholesterol or other fats (lipids) in the blood (hyperlipidemia) (hyperlipidemia). Taking CLA by mouth or drinking milk containing CLA doesn’t seem to improve levels of cholesterol or blood fats called triglycerides in persons with mildly high cholesterol levels.

There is interest in using CLA for a number of other purposes, but there isn’t enough reliable information to say whether it might be helpful.

Side Effects

When eaten by mouth: CLA is likely safe when taken in amounts normally found in foods, such as milk and beef. It is possibly safe when used in bigger amounts as medicine. It could produce adverse symptoms such as stomach discomfort, diarrhea, nausea, exhaustion, and headache.

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Important Safety Instructions and Cautionary Notes

When eaten by mouth: When consumed in amounts that are typically found in foods, such as milk and beef, CLA is likely to be safe for consumption. When used as medicine in larger quantities, it might not pose any health risks. It could produce adverse symptoms such as stomach discomfort, diarrhea, nausea, exhaustion, and headache.

CLA is considered safe to consume during pregnancy and breastfeeding when consumed orally in doses that are typically found in foods. However, there is not enough trustworthy information to determine whether or not it is safe to use CLA in greater quantities while pregnant or breastfeeding. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

Children: CLA is likely safe when taken by mouth in amounts usually found in meals. CLA supplements are likely safe for children when taken by mouth for up to 7 months. There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine whether or not the usage of supplements for an extended period of time is safe.

Bleeding diseases. Taking CLA supplements could make the blood clot more slowly. In principle, persons who already have a bleeding issue would be more likely to experience bruising and bleeding if they take CLA.

There is a possibility that using CLA supplements could make diabetes symptoms even more severe. Avoid usage.

If you already have metabolic syndrome, taking CLA supplements may make you more likely to develop diabetes in the future, according to some research. Take care when using.

Surgery: CLA supplements could cause excessive bleeding during and after surgery. Put an end to your use of it at least two weeks before your scheduled surgical procedure.

What are the interactions?

Interaction that is Not Overbearing

Take precautions when using these two together.

Medications for high blood pressure (Antihypertensive medications) interact with CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID (CLA) \sCLA might reduce blood pressure. Taking CLA in conjunction with drugs that already lower blood pressure could result in an unsafely low blood pressure reading. Always keep a tight eye on your blood pressure.

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Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID (CLA) \sCLA might slow blood clotting. Taking CLA combined with drugs that help reduce blood coagulation might raise the risk of bruising and bleeding.

Altace, also known as ramipril, has been shown to interact with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)

It appears that taking CLA in conjunction with ramipril results in a greater reduction in blood pressure than taking ramipril on its own. Combining ramipril with CLA could result in an unsafely low blood pressure reading for you. Maintain a watchful eye on your blood pressure.

Dosing

CLA is found in its natural form in a variety of foods, including beef and dairy products. The daily intake of CLA from the typical diet ranges from 15 to 174 mg. As a supplement, CLA has most typically been used by adults in doses of 1.6-6.8 grammes by mouth daily for 2-12 weeks. Talk to a medical professional about your symptoms to get a recommendation on the appropriate dosage for your condition.

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