Vitamin E - Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Vitamin E – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Vitamin E – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

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Overview

One of the vitamins that can be dissolved in fat is vitamin E. It can be found in a wide variety of foods, such as cereals, vegetable oils, meat, poultry, eggs, and even some fruits.

Vitamin E is a crucial nutrient that is essential for the healthy operation of a wide variety of organs throughout the body. Additionally, it functions as an antioxidant. The vitamin E that is produced naturally in foods, known as RRR-alpha-tocopherol, is distinct from the vitamin E that is produced synthetically for use in dietary supplements (all-rac-alpha-tocopherol).

Vitamin E insufficiency is uncommon, however, it can happen to persons who have specific genetic abnormalities and in extremely premature children who weigh very little. Vitamin E deficiency can be treated with vitamin E. Vitamin E is widely utilized for a wide variety of other illnesses; however, the majority of these additional applications are not supported by solid scientific evidence.

Uses & Effectiveness

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A disorder that affects one’s ability to manage their motor skills that is hereditary (ataxia with vitamin E deficiency or AVED). When treating vitamin E insufficiency caused by this inherited movement condition, oral administration of vitamin E is an effective treatment option.

Vitamin E deficiency. Consuming vitamin E through oral supplementation is an excellent method for treating and preventing vitamin E insufficiency.

Alzheimer’s disease treatment could perhaps be successful. It does not appear that ingesting vitamin E supplements through the mouth will prevent the development of Alzheimer’s disease. But vitamin E, when used in conjunction with certain Alzheimer’s medications, may slow down the progression of memory loss in patients who already have Alzheimer’s disease.

A blood condition characterized by decreased quantities of the protein known as hemoglobin in the blood (beta-thalassemia). Oral vitamin E supplementation appears to be beneficial for youngsters dealing with this blood disease.

Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). It has been shown that taking vitamin E orally for two days prior to the onset of menstruation and for three days following the onset of menstruation will lessen menstrual pain and blood loss.

An hereditary condition that leads to the destruction of red blood cells in reaction to emotional or physical stress (G6PD deficiency). People who have this illness might benefit from taking vitamin E by mouth, either on its own or in combination with selenium.

Internal haemorrhaging within the skull (intracranial hemorrhage). Consuming vitamin E through the digestive system appears to lower the risk of bleeding in the skull in preterm newborns.

a haemorrhage that occurs within or around the fluid-filled cavities (ventricles) of the brain (intraventricular hemorrhage). Premature newborns may have a lower chance of developing brain haemorrhage if they receive vitamin E through oral administration. However, giving these infants large amounts of vitamin E may raise the likelihood that they will develop a deadly blood infection known as sepsis.

When nitrates are taken continuously throughout the day, the therapeutic benefit of the nitrates is diminished (nitrate tolerance). Taking vitamin E in an oral form on a regular basis can be an effective method for preventing nitrate tolerance.

In persons who don’t consume alcohol at all or very rarely, the liver might swell and become inflamed, and fat can accumulate there (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH). It appears that taking vitamin E by mouth on a regular basis can reduce inflammation and improve liver indicators in both adults and children who have this form of liver disease.

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Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). In some women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS), taking vitamin E orally appears to alleviate symptoms of anxiety, cravings, and depression.

A movement problem that is frequently brought on by antipsychotic medication (tardive dyskinesia). It appears that improving one’s vitamin E intake through oral consumption can help reduce symptoms linked with this movement disease.

It’s Possible That This Won’t Work for

a degenerative eye condition that is most common in people over the age of 60 (age-related macular degeneration or AMD). Consuming vitamin E through the digestive system, either on its own or in combination with other antioxidants, does not help prevent or correct eyesight loss that is caused by ageing.

Lou Gehrig’s disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS). Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) used orally in combination with conventional treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) does not improve patients’ functional abilities or their chances of surviving the disease.

Chest pain (angina). Consuming vitamin E through the digestive system may have some impact on the way blood vessels work, but it does not appear to alleviate chest discomfort.

The narrowing and hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). It does not appear that oral supplementation with vitamin E (RRR-alpha-tocopherol) can slow or prevent the hardening of the arteries in those who have this problem.

Eczema (atopic dermatitis). There is no correlation between orally ingesting vitamin E alone or in combination with selenium and an improvement in eczema symptoms.

People undergoing treatment for breast cancer often have hot flashes. It does not appear that taking vitamin E by mouth can diminish the frequency or severity of hot flashes experienced by breast cancer survivors.

A respiratory condition that is common in infants and children (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). It does not appear that taking vitamin E in pill form can lower the likelihood of a newborn acquiring this lung illness.

Cataracts. Consuming vitamin E through the digestive system does not protect against cataracts.

Damage to the nerves in the hands and feet that was caused by the treatment for the malignancy. There is no correlation between taking vitamin E before and after treatment with a particular class of cancer medications and a reduced risk of nerve injury.

Colon cancer, rectal cancer. Consuming vitamin E through oral supplementation does not lessen the chance of developing colon or rectal cancer.

Failure of the heart, as well as accumulation of fluid in the body (congestive heart failure or CHF). People who have CHF do not appear to experience an improvement in heart function after taking vitamin E orally for a period of 12 weeks. It does not lower the risk of developing coronary heart disease either.

Cancer of the head and neck. It does not appear that taking vitamin E in pill form on a daily basis will lower the risk of head and neck cancer recurring. In point of fact, it may actually enhance the likelihood that the cancer will come back. Vitamin E supplements in amounts more than 400 international units (IU) should be avoided by patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer.

Elevated levels of blood pressure. People who are currently taking blood pressure medication and taking vitamin E by mouth do not appear to have a reduction in their blood pressure.

babies who were undernourished when they were born, as indicated by a birth weight that was below the 10th percentile. Consuming vitamin E by oral supplementation during pregnancy does not reduce the likelihood of having a baby born with a low birth weight as a result of inadequate nourishment while the baby was developing in the womb.

Disease of the liver People who have liver illness do not benefit from taking vitamin E orally because it does not lower their mortality risk.

A common side effect of smoking is the development of white spots inside the mouth (oral leukoplakia). It has been shown that oral vitamin E supplementation for up to seven years does not diminish the risk of mouth sores in male smokers.

Osteoarthritis. Oral supplementation with vitamin E does not appear to alleviate the discomfort associated with osteoarthritis, either in terms of pain or stiffness. It also appears that vitamin E does not inhibit the progression of osteoarthritis in any way.

Cancer of the pancreas. It does not appear that oral use of vitamin E, either on its own or in combination with other antioxidants such as beta-carotene and vitamin C, can lessen the chance of developing pancreatic cancer.

Parkinson disease. It does not appear that taking vitamin E by mouth will mitigate the symptoms of Parkinson disease or slow down their progression.

A form of cancer that affects the throat (pharyngeal cancer). People who have diabetes do not appear to benefit from an oral vitamin E supplement in terms of a reduced risk of mouth or pharyngeal cancer.

A condition that can occur during pregnancy and is characterised by elevated blood pressure and the presence of protein in the urine (pre-eclampsia). It does not appear that consuming vitamin E through oral supplementation can lower the chance of developing high blood pressure when pregnant.

Birth that is too early. Taking vitamin E in pill form orally during pregnancy does not reduce the likelihood of having a baby born prematurely.

Prostate cancer. Consuming vitamin E through oral supplementation does not lower the chance of developing prostate cancer. It is possible that it will, in fact, make the danger greater for some individuals.

A disease that affects the airways. It does not appear that ingesting vitamin E will help protect against infections of the respiratory tract. In addition, it did not appear to alleviate symptoms in those who have an upper respiratory infection.

An eye ailment that runs in families and is characterised by impaired night vision and a loss of peripheral vision (retinitis pigmentosa). In patients with this illness, oral vitamin E supplementation does not appear to decrease the progression of visual loss, and in some cases may even hasten the process.

Scarring. It does not appear that applying vitamin E to the skin will lessen the amount of scarring that occurs after surgery.

Stillbirth. Taking vitamin E in pill form orally during pregnancy does not reduce the likelihood of having a stillbirth.

Most Likely Not to Be Effective for

Cancer of the breast There is no correlation between increasing the amount of vitamin E consumed by diet or taking vitamin E supplements orally with a reduced risk of breast cancer.

Cancer. Oral consumption of vitamin E does not result in a decreased risk of cancer overall.

Coronary artery disease Consuming vitamin E through the digestive system does not protect healthy persons or those at risk from developing heart disease. It also does not appear to prevent heart attacks or strokes in individuals who already have heart disease.

The passing away of an unborn child or a newborn born prematurely. It does not appear that giving vitamin E orally to preterm newborns lowers the risk of death in the infant.

A breast condition that is not malignant and is considered to be benign (fibrocystic breast disease). Consuming vitamin E through the digestive system for a period of two to three months does not help treat fibrocystic breast disease.

Cancer of the lung Vitamin E supplementation through oral consumption for a period of up to eight years does not protect male smokers from getting lung cancer.

Any kind of fatality is acceptable. Consuming vitamin E through oral supplementation does not lower the chance of dying from any cause.

The process of maturation and development in preterm newborns. It does not appear that orally administered vitamin E can either prevent or treat anemia in premature newborns.

There is considerable interest in applying vitamin E to a variety of additional functions; however, there is insufficient trustworthy data to determine whether or not this could be beneficial.

Side Effects

Vitamin E, when taken orally and at doses lower than one thousand milligrammes per day, is expected to be safe for the vast majority of people. This is equivalent to 1100 international units (IU) of synthetic vitamin E (all-rac-alpha-tocopherol) or 1500 international units (IU) of natural vitamin E. (RRR-alpha-tocopherol). The higher the dose, the greater the potential for adverse effects. Nausea, lethargy, headaches, and even bleeding are all potential adverse reactions that could occur. When consumed in amounts larger than 1000 milligrams on a daily basis, vitamin E may pose a health risk.

Vitamin E is considered to be risk-free for topical use by the vast majority of persons.

Vitamin E may present some health risks if it is breathed in. Some persons have had severe lung damage after using electronic cigarettes and other vaping products that contain vitamin E acetate. This link has been established.

Special Precautions and Warnings

Vitamin E, when taken orally and at doses lower than one thousand milligrammes per day, is expected to be safe for the vast majority of people. This is equivalent to 1100 international units (IU) of synthetic vitamin E (all-rac-alpha-tocopherol) or 1500 international units (IU) of natural vitamin E. (RRR-alpha-tocopherol). The higher the dose, the greater the potential for adverse effects. Nausea, lethargy, headaches, and even bleeding are all potential adverse reactions that could occur. When consumed in amounts larger than 1000 milligrams on a daily basis, vitamin E may pose a health risk.

Vitamin E is considered to be risk-free for topical use by the vast majority of persons.

Vitamin E may present some health risks if it is breathed in. Some persons have had severe lung damage after using electronic cigarettes and other vaping products that contain vitamin E acetate. This link has been established. Vitamin E is thought to be safe for usage during pregnancy if it is taken in the amount that is suggested for daily consumption. During the first eight weeks of your pregnancy, you should refrain from taking vitamin E supplements unless your healthcare professional advises you to do so.

It is possible that the infant will be harmed by it. In the later stages of pregnancy, the maximum dose of vitamin E that is recommended is 800 milligrams for women aged 14 to 18 years old and 1000 milligrams for women aged 18 years or older.

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Vitamin E is thought to be safe for nursing mothers to consume in the doses that are suggested for daily use. Those between the ages of 14 and 18 are advised to consume no more than 800 milligrams of vitamin E while breastfeeding, while those older than 18 should consume no more than 1000 milligrams. When used in doses that are higher than the maximum quantity that is suggested for consumption, vitamin E may have adverse effects.

 

When administered in the recommended manner, vitamin E should not pose a health risk to children. However, children should not take vitamin E in levels that are higher than the daily upper limits recommended amounts. These limitations are 300 IU for children aged one to three years old, 450 IU for children aged four to eight years old, 900 IU for children aged nine to thirteen years old, and 1200 IU for children aged fourteen to eighteen years old.

 

Bleeding disorders: Vitamin E could make bleeding problems worse. Vitamin E supplements should not be taken by individuals who have a bleeding issue.

 

People who have a history of heart disease may have an increased mortality risk if they take vitamin E, depending on the severity of their condition. Vitamin E should not be used in amounts higher than 400 international units on a daily basis by people who have a history of cardiovascular disease.

 

People who have diabetes may have an increased likelihood of developing heart failure if they take vitamin E. Vitamin E should not be consumed in amounts higher than 400 international units on a daily basis by diabetics.

 

Cancer of the head and neck: Vitamin E may raise the risk of a recurrence of this disease. Vitamin E supplements in amounts higher than 400 international units (IU) per day should not be taken.

 

People who suffer from osteoporosis, a condition characterised by fragile bones, may try increasing their bone density by engaging in physical activity. It is possible that the positive effects of exercise on bone strength are diminished when the exercises are combined with high dosages of vitamin E and vitamin C.

 

There is some evidence that vitamin E consumption is associated with an increased risk of getting prostate cancer. It is unknown how vitamin E would affect persons who already have prostate cancer, but it is possible that it could make the problem even more severe.

 

A genetic eye ailment known as retinitis pigmentosa, which leads to impaired night vision and decreased peripheral vision: 400 international units of all-rac-alpha-tocopherol, which is a synthetic form of vitamin E, appears to hasten the progression of eyesight loss in persons who have this illness. However, it appears that far lower levels, specifically 3 IU, do not have this impact. If you have this problem, staying away from vitamin E pills is in your best interest.

 

People who have had a stroke in the past can be more likely to pass away from their condition if they take vitamin E. People who have had a stroke in the past should avoid taking doses of vitamin E that are higher than 400 international units per day.

 

Vitamin E may raise the likelihood of experiencing bleeding both during and after surgical procedures. At least two weeks before a scheduled operation, you should finish taking any vitamin E supplements you’ve been taking.

Interactions

Interaction that is Not Overbearing

Take precautions when using these two together.

Neoral and Sandimmune’s cyclosporine (Neoral) has been shown to interact with vitamin E.

It is possible that the amount of cyclosporine that is absorbed by the body will increase if significant quantities of vitamin E are taken at the same time. It’s possible that this will make the cyclosporine’s effects and adverse effects worse.

Medications that are metabolised by the liver, known as substrates for the cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme, interact with vitamin E.

The liver is responsible for the transformation and breakdown of certain drugs. It’s possible that vitamin E will alter the rate at which the liver processes these drugs. It is possible that the effects and side effects of these medications will vary as a result of this.

Interactions between chemotherapy and vitamin E are possible in the treatment of cancer.

One type of antioxidant is vitamin E. It is possible that antioxidants could reduce the effectiveness of certain cancer treatments, and this is a source of considerable concern. Before taking vitamin E, people who are currently getting treatment for cancer should discuss this with their healthcare physician.

Vitamin E has an effect on how medications that slow blood clotting (anticoagulant and antiplatelet medicines) work in the body.

It’s possible that vitamin E will prevent blood from clotting. It is possible that the risk of bruising and bleeding will rise if vitamin E is taken in conjunction with other drugs that also delay blood coagulation.

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There is an interaction between niacin and vitamin E.

Niacin, when used with the medication simvastatin, has the potential to raise levels of “good” cholesterol. Consuming niacin and simvastatin together, in addition to vitamin E and other antioxidants, has been shown to attenuate the beneficial effects of both substances on levels of good cholesterol. It is not known whether or not vitamin E alone can reduce the effects of niacin in combination with simvastatin on levels of good cholesterol.

The blood thinner Warfarin (Coumadin) is known to interact with vitamin E.

Warfarin is taken to reduce the likelihood of blood clots forming. Additionally, vitamin E helps reduce the rate at which blood clots. When vitamin E is taken in conjunction with warfarin, there is an increased risk of bleeding and bruising. Always remember to get your blood examined on a regular basis. It’s possible that your current dose of warfarin needs to be adjusted.

 

Cancer drugs, often known as antitumor antibiotics, have been shown to interact with vitamin E.

One type of antioxidant is vitamin E. It is possible that antioxidants could lessen the efficacy of cancer treatments like medicine. This is a source of some concern. Before taking vitamin E, people who are currently getting treatment for cancer should discuss this with their healthcare physician.

Koselugo (seleumetinib) has a drug interaction with vitamin E.

Vitamin E is present in selumetinib, a medication that is used to treat cancer. Combining selumetinib with supplements containing vitamin E may result in an excessively high level of vitamin E in the body. The possibility of bleeding could be increased as a result of this.

Dosing

One of the most vital nutrients is vitamin E. Vitamin E can be found in plentiful supply in foods such as wheat germ oil, vegetable oils, cereals, meat, poultry, eggs, and fruits. The term “recommended dietary allowance” refers to the quantity that should be ingested on a daily basis at the very least (RDA). The recommended daily allowance (RDA) of natural vitamin E, also known as RRR-alpha-tocopherol, is 15 milligrams (22 international units) for adults, 15 milligrams (22 IU) for pregnant women, and 19 milligrams (28 IU) for nursing mothers.

It is important to keep in mind that the doses of natural vitamin E (RRR-alpha-tocopherol) and vitamin E that have been synthesized in the lab (all-rac-alpha-tocopherol) are calculated differently from one another. Because of this, proper supplement dosing can be difficult. Until more is known about the hazards and advantages of these supplements, the American Heart Association advises getting vitamin E through a healthy, well-balanced diet rather than from supplements in order to get the best possible health benefits.

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