Thai Red Curry- 7 Different Types of Thai Curry Recipes 2022

Thai Red Curry- 7 Different Types of Thai Curry Recipes 2022

Thai Red Curry- 7 Different Types of Thai Curry Recipes 2022

Types of Thai Curry, Types of Curry – Most Popular Indian Curry Recipes 2022. popular types of curry, types of chinese curry, different types of curry powder, types of curry explained, types of indian curry, how many different types of curry are there,types of indian curry with pictures, thai curry recipe, thai curry recipe green, green thai curry, thai curry chicken, vegetarian thai curry recipe, thai curry paste

WHAT EXACTLY IS CURRY? YOUR COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO CURRIES

Among other things, this curry guide discusses the history of curry, what curry powder is and how it differs from actual curry, the most popular forms of curry, and other topics. Those of you who are wondering, “What is curry?” will no longer have that question after reading this.

The word curry quickly conjures up images of an Indian cuisine that is bursting with flavour and richness. It might be said that it embodies the personality of the country from which it originates. Curries have grown into much more than just food over the years; they now elicit an emotion—one of comfort, while also tickling your taste buds and making you salivate just thinking about them! A bowl of freshly cooked curry cooking on the stove may transport you on a sensory voyage. After all, there are very few dishes that can compete with this flavour and aroma.

Suppose we informed you that curry is not a flavour, but rather that it just refers to “sauce or gravy” instead. In most cases, this famous Indian dish is cooked with vegetables and meat and served over a bed of basmati rice. It’s strongly spicy and never fails to satisfy the senses. It all depends on your particular preference and tolerance for spicy cuisine whether you want a mild curry or one that packs a big punch of heat.

Curry is one of the most well-known dishes in Indian cuisine, and it never fails to please, especially if you take the time to prepare your own from scratch. Intrigued? Continue reading to learn how to decode curry in this complete curry guide.

Topics covered in the article are listed below.

In this essay, we’ll cover everything you need to know about curry, including the following topics:

What exactly is Curry?

What is the origin of curry?

What is Curry Powder and how does it work?

Curry Dishes of Various Types

Sukhi’s Curries

Red Thai Curry

Types of Thai Curry

WHAT IS CURRY?

Curry, in its most basic definition, is an Indian gravy or sauce that is served with meat, tofu, or vegetables. It’s eaten over rice, most commonly Basmati rice, and features a variety of spices from which to choose. Depending on the ingredients in your recipe, you could end up with a moderate curry or a curry that is really spicy.

The preparation of curry varies according to geography, with each region having its own specialties. Chicken Tikka Masala from my family may differ from the recipe from your family, and that is perfectly acceptable! Curry is just as good as the ingredients you use to prepare it.

ORIGIN OF CURRY

Curry has a fascinating history, one that includes numerous countries and their illustrious cultures as a backdrop. Curries have been a mainstay of eastern cuisine for millennia, ranging from Southeast Asia through the Middle East and Indian subcontinent. Currently, as can be seen, it has spread from its early origins to find a place on innumerable dining tables across the world, and it is appreciated by people of many ethnicities and nations throughout the world.

However, the truth is that no one can pinpoint exactly when curry was first created or when it first became popular in Indian cuisine. What is known is that the usage of spices in a sauce to flavour meats may be traced back to Mohenjo-Daro about 2500 BCE, when the civilization was founded. Archaeological evidence also demonstrates the usage of a mortar and pestle to pound spices such as mustard, fennel, cumin, and tamarind pods, which were then used to flavour meals with flavours such as mustard and fennel.

Indian monks traversing the Silk Route, it is believed, were responsible for the spread of curries throughout Asia and Europe from there. Curries were also inspired by new world explorers from Spain and Portugal, who introduced chilli peppers to India, where they replaced black pepper as the most pungent spice in curries. Since the British introduced Indian curries to Japan, the spread of curries throughout Asia has been pushed even more, and it is fair to claim that the curry has spread to every country under British rule in the world.

WHAT IS CURRY POWDER

“Kari” is a Tamil term that simply means “sauce,” and it is the source of the word “curry.” There are thousands of distinct types of curry available in India and throughout the world. This dish’s taste and consistency differ from one location to the next, depending on factors such as topography, availability of ingredients, as well as the cultural and religious preferences of the people who live in that particular region.

Curry powder, on the other hand, might be referred to as a “potpourri of spices” in some circles. Simply described, a curry is a ‘dry blend of spices’ that is used in the preparation of the dish. This spice blend, which may be found on grocery shelves, contains turmeric, ground coriander, ground cumin, ground ginger, and black pepper.

Soldiers going home from India during the British control of India created and brought this current version to Britain, where it has become popular. The concept was to combine the basic components that were used in the most popular forms of Indian curry to produce a dish that tasted just like it did on Indian soil, but on British soil.

However, curry powder was never intended to be used alone to flavour a food, and it was certainly not intended to be used uncooked as a flavouring component for a dish such as ‘curry chicken salad.’ One of the reasons some people equate the word ‘curry’ with the word ‘taste’ is because of the spicy flavour of curry chicken salad.

The traditional way of utilising spices in curries is to make a ‘tarka,’ or pan fry spices in oil, before adding them to the dish. It is the heat that releases the flavours and allows them to infuse into the oil, which is then poured over the primary ingredients. This procedure also has the additional benefit of mellowing down some of the strong tones found in raw spice blends.

HISTORY OF CURRY

Curry has a fascinating history, one that includes numerous countries and their illustrious cultures as a backdrop. Curries have been a mainstay of eastern cuisine for millennia, ranging from Southeast Asia through the Middle East and Indian subcontinent. Currently, as can be seen, it has spread from its early origins to find a place on innumerable dining tables across the world, and it is appreciated by people of many ethnicities and nations throughout the world.

However, the truth is that no one can pinpoint exactly when curry was first created or when it first became popular in Indian cuisine. What is known is that the usage of spices in a sauce to flavour meats may be traced back to Mohenjo-Daro about 2500 BCE, when the civilization was founded. Archaeological evidence also demonstrates the usage of a mortar and pestle to pound spices such as mustard, fennel, cumin, and tamarind pods, which were then used to flavour meals with flavours such as mustard and fennel.

Indian monks traversing the Silk Route, it is believed, were responsible for the spread of curries throughout Asia and Europe from there. Chilli peppers, which were introduced to India by new world adventurers from Spain and Portugal, were also influential in the development of curries; previously, black pepper was the most pungent component in curries. Since the British introduced Indian curries to Japan, the spread of curries throughout Asia has been pushed even more, and it is fair to claim that the curry has spread to every country under British rule in the world.

TYPES OF CURRY

As a result of its widespread use throughout the world and the numerous civilizations that incorporate curry into their cuisine, we believe that curry and curry recipes hold a unique and particular place in the culinary world. It doesn’t matter if you prefer your curry mild or particularly spicy (or “Indian hot,” as some may refer to it), curry is unquestionably a comfort food that almost everyone enjoys. A growing number of people are now discovering and enjoying the delicacy of vegetarian curries, thanks to the popularity of vegetarian curries on the market.

Cooking with curry is a social activity in India, and curries in particular are well-known for bringing people together for a fast snack or a rich feast shared with family and friends. A tendency that has spread to many nations with Indian communities, and it is unquestionably true that when most people think of the word “curry,” they think of delectable Indian cuisine.

In most cases, while comparing different curries, there are at least one or two traits that they all share in common. Red, yellow, and green curries, as well as massaman and panang curries, are among the most popular. These curries differ from place to region, but they share some characteristics in terms of their composition, such as the use of chiles, vegetables, and spices.

POPULAR CURRIES AROUND THE WORLD

The essential beauty of a meal is found in its versatility, which is one of the many reasons why curry has become such a global phenomenon in recent years. Let’s take a look at how different locations have developed their own distinct curry.

Thai Red Curry- 7 Different Types of Thai Curry Recipes 2022
Thai Red Curry- 7 Different Types of Thai Curry Recipes 2022

Types Of Thai Curry

There are a few various types of Thai curry, but the most popular are the red, yellow, and green varieties, which are distinguished by the colour of the curry paste used in their preparation.

The chilies and other spices used in the production of each style of Thai curry give each curry its own colour and flavour. There are also a few additional sorts of Thai curries that are less well-known but are equally as good as the more renowned ones.

All Thai curries, with the exception of those containing chiles, are traditionally made with comparable components. In order to improve the flavour of the recipes, more components have been added over time, resulting in a more unique taste from one another.

Let’s have a look at some of the different sorts of Thai curries available:

1. Green Curry (Gaeng Kiew Whan)

As the most well-known Thai curry dish, green curry is mildly spicy and incredibly creamy, thanks to the use of green chilli paste and coconut milk in the preparation.

Green curry is a dish that originated in central Thailand and is traditionally made with a combination of shallots, lemongrass, white pepper, coriander root, garlic, kaffir lime, shrimp paste, and sea salt, as well as green chilli paste and coconut milk, all of which contribute to the dish’s distinct flavour.

It is most commonly served with chicken or fish balls in Thailand, but it can also be made with other meats or seafood. Thai green curry is typically made with green vegetables such as green eggplant and fresh herbs such as sweet basil leaves, but it can also be made with meat or seafood.

2. Penaeng Curry (Gaeng Penaeng)

Penang curry is a less well-known curry that is frequently confused with another red curry dish of similar appearance (another type of Thai curry).

In comparison to green curry, Penang is milder and has a consistency that is comparable to that of green curry; however, it utilises less coconut milk than green curry, which results in the texture being slightly less liquidy.

Penang curry is a milder version of the popular Thai dish and is created with spices like as cumin and nutmeg, as well as long red chilies, shallots, garlic, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime rind, coriander root, white pepper, sea salt, and shrimp paste, among other ingredients. It is typically served on the side of a bowl of rice, with the coconut cream on top to finish it off.

When it comes to Thai cuisine, Panang curry is typically cooked with beef or pork, though it can also be made with peanuts depending on where you are in the country. It is possible to make this curry with a limited selection of veggies.

3. Red Curry (Gaeng Phed)

When dealing with Thai curries, it is simple to make a mistake because they are so similar to one another that you may wind up confusing one of them with another, which is a common occurrence. This is frequently caused by oversimplification or by attempting to categorise the curries according to their coloration.

Although it may appear that the only difference between red and green curry is the colour and potentially additional ingredients such as the choice of fresh herbs or vegetables, the variations are substantial, albeit minor.

Both curries share several characteristics in common, including the use of a comparable Thai paste and coconut milk foundation, which transforms the dish into a soup-like curry sauce, and the employment of similar cooking techniques.

Nonetheless, whereas the Penang dish is a bit sweeter, the red curry is savorier and spicier in flavour. Given that red curry is much less sweet and much more flavorful than other curries, it is best served with something rich, such as fatty hog or duck meat.

4. Sour Orange Curry (Gaeng Som)

This sort of Thai curry is more of a soup than a curry, and it contains no coconut milk. Despite the fact that the base paste has only five ingredients, it is one of the spicier curries available due to the fact that it is water-based.

The sour orange curry paste is produced using dried red chilies, finger root ginger, shallots, sea salt, and shrimp paste, among other ingredients. Tamari and some form of tropical fruit, such as pineapple, are used to create a sour flavour in this meal, which is served cold.

Sour orange curry is typically made with fish or shrimp, as well as any vegetables that are requested and readily accessible.

5. Massaman Curry (Gaeng Massaman)

Because it is one of the types of Thai curry that must be cooked on a low heat for an extended period of time, massaman curry is not often available in restaurants. However, the wait is definitely worth it, as there is a distinct difference between slow-cooked Thai curries and faster-cooked Thai curries.

Massaman is a Malaysian dish that is mild and contains coconut milk, as well as spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg. It is traditionally served with rice.

In most cases, chunks of potato and peanuts are used to make massaman curry, which results in a thicker, more stew-like consistency with a mild, somewhat sweet flavour. This meal is most usually made with chicken, however beef is also a popular choice for this preparation.

6. Jungle Curry (Gaeng Pa)

Tropical curry, which originates in central Thailand and derives its name from the variety of herbs, vegetables, and other ingredients used in its preparation, is a flavorful dish that may also be quite spicy.

A water-based cuisine, jungle curry’s curry paste is produced from a mix of herbs and chillies, giving the dish its distinct flavour.

The most popular meats used in this Thai curry are chicken or pork, however other varieties of wild meats such as boar or even frog can be added to give the dish an even more unusual taste and flavour.

7. Yellow Curry (Gaeng Luang)

Sour orange curry is a water-based curry that is slightly spicier than yellow curry, which is another popular curry dish. In most cases, a liquid fish base, curry paste, and turmeric are used to create this curry, which gives the meal its yellowish colour.

Yellow curry is typically made with fish, such as sea bass, mackerel, or whatever else the cook has in mind. Bamboo shoots, green papaya, and lotus stems are just a few of the unusual ingredients that are used in this recipe.

Curry is a complex and diversified cuisine, and every family prepares it in their own way, with their own spin, but with a fairly consistent base.

This is not a comprehensive list of Thai curries because there are many different types of Thai curry, and variants on those types are as many as the number of palm trees in the country of Thailand. However, if you want to learn more, this is an excellent place to begin!

 

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