Progesterone - Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Progesterone – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

Progesterone – Uses, Side Effects, Warnings, and More

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Overview

One of the hormones that can be found naturally in the body is called progesterone. Ovaries are the primary organs responsible for their production, and pregnancy cannot occur without them. It is also possible to produce it in a laboratory.

Both menstrual cycles and the symptoms of menopause can be influenced by progesterone levels. All progesterone products are manufactured in a lab. Progesterone that is derived from wild yam or soy and named diosgenin is referred to as “natural progesterone.” This type of progesterone can be manufactured. Since the human body is unable to convert diosgenin into progesterone, consuming foods like wild yam or soy will not result in an increase in progesterone levels.

People take progesterone supplements and other over-the-counter medicines for a wide variety of health issues, including infertility, menopausal symptoms, and many more; however, there is insufficient reliable scientific data to support any of these uses.

Progesterone products available without a doctor’s prescription may contain more or less of the hormone than what is stated on the packaging. These goods are exempt from needing approval from the FDA. Progesterone products available by prescription should be used only after consulting with a qualified medical professional. In addition, progesterone should not be confused with pregnenolone or wild yam. These are two entirely different things.

Uses & Effectiveness

At this time, we do not have any information regarding the uses of PROGESTERONE.

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Side Effects

Progesterone drugs available only by prescription and administered orally are thought to be risk-free when used carefully and under the supervision of a medical professional. There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine whether or not progesterone products or supplements available without a prescription are safe. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

When used appropriately and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, progesterone medications available by prescription are likely to be safe when placed topically into the vagina. There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine whether or not progesterone products available without a prescription are safe. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

Special Precautions and Warnings

Progesterone drugs available only by prescription and administered orally are thought to be risk-free when used carefully and under the supervision of a medical professional. There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine whether or not progesterone products or supplements available without a prescription are safe. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

When used appropriately and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, progesterone medications available by prescription are likely to be safe when placed topically into the vagina. There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine whether or not progesterone products available without a prescription are safe. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

Pregnancy: It is likely safe to use prescription progesterone drugs when they are put into the vagina as part of the treatment for infertility or while pregnant in order to prevent preterm labor. However, if progesterone is used during pregnancy for any other reason, there is a high probability that it will cause adverse effects. There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine whether or not using progesterone that does not require a prescription is safe while pregnant. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

Breastfeeding: There is not enough trustworthy evidence available to determine whether or not using progesterone while breastfeeding is safe. To be on the safe side, you should avoid using it.

If you suffer from artery disease, you should avoid using any kinds of progesterone that do not require a doctor’s prescription.

If you currently have breast cancer or have a family history of breast cancer, you should avoid using any forms of progesterone that do not require a prescription.

Depression: If you suffer from depression, you should avoid using any types of progesterone that do not require a prescription.

Liver illness: Progesterone could make liver disease worse. If you have liver illness, you shouldn’t use any types of progesterone that don’t require a prescription.

Progesterone has the potential to bring on an episode of porphyria in patients. If you have porphyria, you shouldn’t use any kinds of progesterone that don’t require a prescription.

Do not use any kind of progesterone that does not require a prescription if you are experiencing vaginal bleeding that has not been diagnosed.

Interactions

Interaction that is Not Overbearing

Take precautions when using these two together.

Estrogens have an effect on the hormone progesterone.

Estrogen and progesterone are both examples of hormones. They are frequently considered synonymous. Some of the negative effects of estrogen can be mitigated by the hormone progesterone. However, there is a possibility that progesterone will diminish the positive benefits of estrogen. It’s possible that using progesterone products alongside estrogen will make your breasts sorer.

A Slightly Interacting Party

Take caution when using these two together.

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The chemotherapy drugs paclitaxel (Abraxane and Onxel) have interaction with progesterone.

It is possible that the amount of paclitaxel found in the blood will rise if high dosages of progesterone are administered intravenously in conjunction with the medicine. It is not quite apparent whether this is a cause for worry with progesterone supplements or other progesterone products that do not require a prescription. Only a trained medical professional should administer IV medications.

Dosing

There is not enough trustworthy information available to determine what a suitable dose of progesterone medications available without a prescription would be. Products available without a prescription could have a different level of progesterone concentration than what is stated on the packaging. These goods are exempt from needing approval from the FDA.

Some progesterone products are available via prescription. Have a conversation about the usage of these products with a healthcare professional.

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